News & Events


News and Events

New Rehab Space & Expanded Availability

 

Our rehab department has changed rooms (still in the same building) and now has a new and improved space! Take a tour with our rehab technician Ashley as she shows off the new digs!

Meet Our Newest Radiologists

Meet the newest members of our revamped diagnostics, imaging, and radiology department, Dr. Lisa Suslak-Brown and Dr. Marina Mavromatis!

For the first time, we now offer a full service radiology department led by board-certified radiologists experienced in all imaging modalities. Our radiology department improves the level of care at VRC by offering both inpatient and outpatient ultrasound, as well as reviewing reads of radiographs, advanced imaging (like our on site CT and MRI), and ultrasound.

Lisa Suslak-Brown, VMD, DACVR
Marina Mavromatis, DVM, DACVR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Mavromatis’ Bio>
Dr. Suslak-Brown’s Bio>
Radiology at VRC>

NOW OFFERING OVERNIGHT, WEEKEND, & HOLIDAY EMERGENCY CARE FOR AVIAN & EXOTIC ANIMALS

We have the training and equipment needed to stabilize and care for all types of avian and exotic animals.

If your family veterinarian is closed and your avian or exotic pet  is experiencing an emergency, you can bring him or her to VRC for care. Once your veterinarian opens up, we will transfer your pet to his or her usual wellness clinic for follow up.

Bilateral Vocal Fold Excision (Mucosoplasty) & Bilateral Arytenoidpexy (BVEAP) Approach to Laryngeal Paralysis in Dogs

Learn how your patient can benefit from the BVEAP technique over the “tie back”.

 

Ken Sadanaga, VMD, DACVS

 

Dr. Ken Sadanaga is recognized for pioneering a new surgical technique to treat laryngeal paralysis in dogs that addresses both the intraluminal and extraluminal contribution of laryngeal paralysis, which the traditional “tie back” method does not.

With the tie back method, one side of the lumen is opened permanently to allow for increased airflow. This technique works well to open the airway and improve breathing but increases the risk of aspiration pneumonia for the remainder of the dog’s life.

With the BVEAP technique, the compromised vocal cords are removed to open the lower intraluminal area of the larynx and the arytenoid cartilages are pexied to thyroid cartilage—thus, addressing the extraluminal contribution to laryngeal paralysis. This artytenoidpexy opens the larynx in a more conservative and symmetrical manner, maintaining a better interface between the glottis and epiglottis during the act of swallowing and therefore significantly reducing the potential for aspiration pneumonia.

Advantages of BVEAP Over “Tie Back”

  • Dogs can swim post-op, which is not recommended after tie back
  • Creates a more functional airway
  • Significantly less prone to aspiration pneumonia

 

To consult with Dr. Sadanaga regarding this innovative technique, contact him at 610-647-2950.