The Advantage of a Board-Certified Veterinary Anesthesiologist Caring for Your Pet

Few things cause pet owners more anxiety and fear than their beloved companion undergoing anesthesia. We understand how frightening this experience can be—we’re pet owners, too. So, we work hard to alleviate those fears with expert anesthetic administration and monitoring, and protocols tailored to your pet. Recently, we welcomed Dr. Raphael Vezina, a board-certified veterinary anesthesiologist who will help us provide your pet with the highest possible standard of care.

What does board certified in veterinary anesthesiology mean?

Some veterinarians, like doctors in human medicine, dedicate their professional lives to a specialty, such as anesthesia, and its applications. An anesthesiologist undergoes three years of rigorous extra training to become board-eligible. The designation means he is specially trained to administer anesthesia and to anticipate, recognize, and care for any anesthetic issues.

This is followed by a rigorous examination to achieve board-certification status from the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia (ACVAA). Passing this examination grants the status of Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia (DACVAA).

What does anesthesia involve for my pet and why is it necessary?

Anesthesia is controlled unconsciousness, where your pet is unaware, unable to move, and doesn’t feel pain, usually during surgery. These three points are key to ensuring the highest quality surgical care. Anesthesia may also be required for imaging cases, such as performing MRIs in animals.

The risks associated with anesthesia depend on the procedure being performed and your pet’s health status. Many pets do not need surgery—other than a spay or neuter procedure—until they are older and acquire dental disease or lumps and bumps. These older pets may suffer from concurrent diseases, such as kidney or heart failure, and a board-eligible anesthesiologist can help prepare patients best prior to anesthesia and tailor anesthetic protocols to each individual patient’s needs.

Many veterinarians refer their older patients to our hospital for surgical procedures because we have a board-certified anesthesiologist on staff. Your family veterinarian may do the same if your dog with heart issues, or your cat with chronic renal failure, needs to undergo anesthesia, or your pet needs in-depth diagnostic testing that is not available at her clinic. We will form a team to diagnose and treat your pet. As a specialty center, we are a full-service veterinary hospital that provides advanced care in neurology, emergency and critical care, internal medicine, oncology, and many other areas, and we are especially proud to offer the services of our board-certified anesthesiologist.

Before your pet’s anesthesia

After your family veterinarian refers your pet to us for a procedure requiring specialized anesthesia, we will first study her medical records to decide on her best anesthetic protocol. We may recommend additional testing, such as blood work, X-rays, an electrocardiogram, or an ultrasound, to determine the extent of your pet’s condition and the effect of anesthesia. We will perform a thorough physical examination to evaluate your pet’s health status, consult with your family veterinarian about the results, and formulate the best anesthetic plan to ensure your pet is pain-free, unaware, and safe during her surgery.

While your pet is anesthetized

When your pet is sufficiently sedated by the pre-medication, we will induce anesthesia, which generally involves an injectable medication to fully sedate her, and then an inhalant form to maintain her level of unconsciousness. With any anesthesia, we always place an endotracheal (breathing) tube down the pet’s throat to maintain the airway, provide oxygen and anesthetic gas, and prevent fluid from getting into the lungs.

anesthesia

Patients undergoing sedation and anesthesia are rigorously monitored so that any changes in their vital signs that could cause a danger to your pet is identified and treated according to current best practices.

Your pet will receive the same level of attention and care during anesthesia that you would. We use the same monitoring equipment used in human hospitals to check her vital signs, including:

  • Heart rate
  • Respiratory rate
  • Heart rhythm
  • Oxygenation level
  • Blood pressure
  • Temperature
  • Depth of anesthesia
  • Pain response

While machines are excellent at providing information regarding your pet’s status under anesthesia, there is no better monitor than our anesthesiologist, who will continuously check your pet’s signs and correct any problems.

After your pet’s anesthesia

The period after anesthesia is critical, and we will closely monitor your pet to ensure she is recovering well from anesthesia and all her vital signs are returning to an awake animal’s normal levels. To help your pet wake up smoothly and comfortably from anesthesia, we follow these rules:

  • Keep the room semi-dark and quiet.
  • Monitor pain and administer more pain control as needed.
  • Maintain ideal body temperature with warming units and blankets.
  • Ensure your pet is breathing well, alert, and swallowing normally before removing the endotracheal tube.
  • Keep your pet calm; some pets become dysphoric during recovery and may need additional sedation.

To mitigate stress and its consequences during your pet’s hospital stay, anti-anxiety medications may also be given as needed.

Your pet may be able to go home or may need continued hospitalization, depending on the procedure, how quickly she makes a full recovery from the anesthesia and her medical condition.

Has your family veterinarian referred your pet to our hospital for a procedure? Are you concerned about anesthesia? Give us a call to discuss the safety measures we take with every pet under the supervision of our board-certified anesthesiologist.